Sunday, April 5, 2009

Maybe it's time to hang the bankers

"If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation then by deflation, the banks and the corporations will grow up around them, will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs." Thomas Jefferson


The government has invested vast sums of money bailing out the banks , automobile industry and AIG. Yet it seems that there is not enough money for these industries. The American people have been asked to foot the bill for the rescue, a rescue of a problem not of their making. This problem was created by a combination of greed and deregulation. Yet the greed continues the bankers don't want to take responsibility for risky practices. There has to be more regulation and more transparency. It is time to break up some of these massive institutions so that a failure does not become a national crisis and those that fail can be allowed to fail. It is also time to stop rewarding incompetence with golden handshakes. Failure is an option.

*****


Bill Moyers Journal

Bill Moyers interviews William K. Black; Analysis of the corruption of the banks.

"WILLIAM K. BLACK
"The financial industry brought the economy to its knees, but how did they get away with it? With the nation wondering how to hold the bankers accountable, Bill Moyers sits down with William K. Black, the former senior regulator who cracked down on banks during the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s. Black offers his analysis of what went wrong and his critique of the bailout."

Recommended Book:

How Would a Patriot Act? Defending American Values from a President Run Amok

"Glenn Greenwald was not a political man. Not liberal, not conservative. Politicians were all the same and it didn’t matter which party was in power. Extremists on both ends canceled each other out, and the United States would essentially remain forever centrist. Or so he thought. Then came September 11, 2001. Greenwald’s disinterest in politics was replaced by patriotism, and he supported the war in Afghanistan. He also gave President Bush the benefit of the doubt over his decision to invade Iraq. But, as he saw Americans and others being disappeared, jailed and tortured, without charges or legal representation, he began to worry. And when he learned his president had seized the power to spy on American citizens on American soil, without the oversight required by law, he could stand no more. At the heart of these actions, Greenwald saw unprecedented and extremist theories of presidential power, theories that flout the Constitution and make President Bush accountable to no one, and no law. How Would a Patriot Act? is one man’s story of being galvanized into action to defend America’s founding principles, and a reasoned argument for what must be done." (Amazon Books)


SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT


Frog, are they the canary in the coal mine for the environment? Around the world in northern forests, rain forests and South America to Australia frogs are dying out.
"Disease is the bullet that's killed the frogs," said study leader J. Alan Pounds of the Tropical Science Center's Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve in Costa Rica. "But climate change is pulling the trigger. Global warming is wreaking havoc on amphibians, and soon will cause staggering losses of biodiversity." Fox News



March 01, 2009
  • Army Sgt. Simone A. Robinson, 21, of Dixmoor, Ill.; assigned to the 634th Brigade Support Battalion of the Illinois Army National Guard, Crestwood, Ill.; died March 1 at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, of wounds sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near her security post Jan. 17 in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    March 02, 2009
  • Army Sgt. Jeffrey A. Reed, 23, of Chesterfield, Va.; assigned to the 411th Military Police Company, 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas; died March 2 in Balad, Iraq, of wounds suffered when his vehicle was struck by a grenade in Taji, Iraq.

    March 03, 2009
  • Army Cpl. Jessica Y. Sarandrea, 22, of Miami, Fla.; assigned to the 3rd Brigade Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas; died March 3 in Mosul, Iraq, of wounds sustained when enemy forces attacked her forward operating base with mortar fire.

    March 07, 2009
  • Army 1st Lt. Daniel B. Hyde, 24, of Modesto, Calif.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; died March 7 in Tikrit, Iraq, of wounds sustained when an explosive device struck his unit vehicle.

    March 08, 2009
  • Army Pfc. Patrick A. Devoe II, 27, of Auburn, N.Y.; assigned to 40th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Fort Richardson, Alaska; died March 8 in Kandau Kalay, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when his vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device.

    March 10, 2009
  • Marine Lance Cpl. Patrick A. Malone, 21, of Ocala, Fla.; assigned to 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died March 10 as a result of a non-hostile incident in Saqlawiyah, Iraq.

    March 14, 2009
  • Marine Staff Sgt. Archie A. Taylor, 37, of Tomball, Texas.; assigned to the 2nd Intelligence Battalion, II MEF Headquarters Group, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died March 14 in a non-hostile incident in Kabul province, Afghanistan.

    March 15, 2009
  • Air Force Staff Sgt. Timothy L. Bowles, 24, of Tucson, Ariz.; assigned to the 3rd Logistics Readiness Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska; died March 15 of wounds sustained when his vehicle encountered an improvised explosive device.

  • Army Sgt. Christopher P. Abeyta, 23, of Midlothian, Ill.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 178th Infantry Regiment, 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Woodstock, Ill.; died March 15 in Jalabad, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained in Kot, Afghanistan, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Also killed were Sgt. Robert M. Weinger and Spc. Normal L. Cain III.

  • Army Sgt. Robert M. Weinger, 24, of Round Lake Beach, Ill.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 178th Infantry Regiment, 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Woodstock, Ill.; died March 15 in Jalabad, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained in Kot, Afghanistan, when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Also killed were Sgt. Christopher P. Abeyta and Spc. Normal L. Cain III.

  • Army Spc. Norman L. Cain III, 22, of Oregon, Ill.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 178th Infantry Regiment, 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Woodstock, Ill.; died March 15 in Kot, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle. Also killed were Sgt. Christopher P. Abeyta and Sgt. Robert. M. Weinger.

    March 16, 2009
  • Army Cpl. Gary L. Moore, 25, of Del City, Okla.; assigned to the 978th Military Police Company, 93rd Military Police Battalion, Fort Bliss, Texas; died March 16 in Baghdad, Iraq, of wounds sustained when an explosive device struck his vehicle.

    March 20, 2009
  • Army Sgt. Jose R. Escobedo, 32, of Albuquerque, N.M.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 77th Field Artillery Regiment in Schweinfurt, Germany; died March 20 in Baghdad, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat-related incident, which happened the previous night at Forward Operating Base Kalsu in Iskandariyah, Iraq.

  • Lance Cpl. Daniel J. Geary, 22, of Rome, N.Y.; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died March 20 while supporting combat operations in Farah province, Afghanistan.

    March 22, 2009
  • Marine Cpl. Anthony L. Williams, 21, of Oxford, Pa.; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died March 22 in Helmand province, Afghanistan, while supporting combat operations. Also killed was Cpl. Michael W. Ouellette.

  • Marine Cpl. Michael W. Ouellette, 28, of Manchester, N.H.; assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died March 22 in Helmand province, Afghanistan, while supporting combat operations. Also killed was Cpl. Anthony L. Williams.

  • Army Pfc. Adam J. Hardt, 19, of Avondale, Ariz.; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, N.Y.; died March 22, at Forward Operating Base Airborne in Wardak province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident.

    March 25, 2009
  • Army Staff Sgt. Raphael A. Futrell, 26, of Anderson, S.C.; assigned to the 13th Military Police Detachment, 728th Military Police Battalion, 8th Military Police Brigade, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, Fort Shafter, Hawaii; died March 25 in Baghdad, Iraq, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident.

    March 27, 2009
  • Navy Lt. Florence B. Choe, 35, of El Cajon, Calif.; died March 27 when an Afghan National Army soldier opened fire on personnel assigned to Combined Security Transition Command — Afghanistan at Camp Shaheen, Mazar-E-Sharif, Afghanistan. Also killed was Navy Lt. j.g. Francis L. Toner IV.

  • Navy Lt. j.g. Francis L. Toner IV, 26, of Narragansett, R.I.; died March 27 when an Afghan National Army soldier opened fire on personnel assigned to Combined Security Transition Command — Afghanistan at Camp Shaheen, Mazar-E-Sharif, Afghanistan. Also killed was Navy Lt. Florence B. Choe.

    March 31, 2009
  • Marine Lance Cpl. Nelson M. Lantigua, 20, of Miami; assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died March 31 in Anbar province, Iraq, as the result of a non-hostile incident.